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Copyright © 2008
Express Publishing Inc
. 
All Rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of Express Publishing Inc. is strictly prohibited. 

Contact Us

The Sun Valley Guide magazine is distributed free four times a year to residents and guests throughout the Sun Valley, Idaho resort area communities.

Subscribers to the Idaho Mountain Express newspaper will receive the Sun Valley Guide with their subscription.


Photo by Chris Pilaro


About us

From the editor

In the fall, the valley relaxes. And it’s not just our bustling grocery store aisles and busy streets that simmer down. When high summer ends, crisp mornings open quieter days and the Wood River Valley seems a bit truer to itself.

But once the crowds have thinned and a sort of privacy returns, nature loses her inhibitions. Aspens and willows go off, flared with sudden change. Amid this colorful riot, festivals punctuate the calendar with activity. If it’s not mules and wagons filling Ketchum’s Main Street, then it’s a boiling flock of sheep, trotting and jumping and clinging together as the wool and mutton flow south to warmer winter pastures.

In central Idaho, autumn is a paradox. We breathe deep and walk hushed streets. Then a weekend comes along and shatters the calm with concerts, celebrations and feasts.

This fall, the Sun Valley Guide explores change in its many forms. Two veteran Idaho journalists—Dean Ferguson and Chuck Oxley—are first-time Guide contributors, and both bring new voices to these pages.

On a Carey ranch, Ferguson finds the withering signs of drought in southeastern Blaine County. He meets Idahoans marking climate change in real time in "The Unforgiving Sky."

Oxley’s first big-game hunt taught him the basics of tracking white-tail deer, but his journey is ultimately an education in self. To kill a majestic wild animal, he learns, requires a stilling of the heart and an initiation into a new state of mind.

In a Craters of the Moon photo essay, Kirsten Hepburn and Ken Retallic land on southern Idaho’s youngest volcanic formations. Hepburn captures a long view of basalt flows that, in just a couple hundred years or so, may transform again.

Change is not always smooth. In it we find the anxiety of the unsettled, but also the intimate beauty of a kaleidoscopic autumn leaf. At the Sun Valley Guide, we remain open to the great variety.


Michael Ames


 

Contributors


Dick Dorworth, pictured with granddaughter Grace, has lived, worked, skied, climbed and driven through many nights in Europe, Asia, Alaska and South America. His work has appeared in many publications and his book Night Driving was published by First Ascent Press in 2007. A registered Democrat, Dorworth thinks his party needs more calcium in its diet. He is also a member of the Sierra Club, but thinks Deep Ecology is closer to the mark. Today Dorworth writes, skis and climbs from Ketchum, Idaho, where he is a reporter and columnist for the Idaho Mountain Express.


Chuck Oxley is a native Iowan who became a Westerner in 1983, when the U.S. Air Force sentenced him to four years at Mountain Home Air Force Base. Following that service, he moved to San Francisco, and enjoyed the world’s most beautiful city. He has held newspaper reporting and editing positions in Portland, Oregon; Ogden, Utah; Pocatello and Boise, Idaho.

 


Kirsten Hepburn would love the luxury of shooting only travel images. Idaho took quite a toll on her gear, with one lens crashing down a granite pinnacle at City of Rocks and another doing a face-plant in the cinders at Craters of the Moon. Her wide-angle lens remained and she used it to capture the craters one late October afternoon.

 

Dean A. Ferguson is a fifth generation Idahoan who grew up on a horse ranch in Bonners Ferry. He has worked as a farmhand on the Palouse, cowboyed on the Snake River Breaks, thinned trees in Montana, and led horseback trail rides in the Alaskan wilderness—not to mention numerous less romantic jobs. Dean is formerly a political reporter for the Lewiston Tribune and spent four years covering the Idaho State Legislature.


publisher
Pam Morris

editor
Michael Ames
editor@sunvalleyguide.com
(Jennifer Tuohy is on maternity leave)

art production manager
Tony Barriatua

Contributing art director
Evelyn Phillips

writers
Dick Dorworth, Dana DuGan, Dean A. Ferguson, David Kirkpatrick, Chuck Oxley, Sabina Dana Plasse, Ken Retallic

Photographers
Nate Galpin, Kirsten Hepburn, Dev Khalsa, Paulette Phlipot, Chris Pilaro, David N. Seelig, Craig Wolfrom

copy editor
Barbara Perkins

ad production & web site designer
Colin McCauley

business manager
Connie Johnson

marketing/sales director
Ben Varner

advertising executives
Alicia Falcocchio, Suzanne Mann, William Pattnosh

 

Idaho Press Club Awards

1st place General Excellence: 2004, 2005 and 2007

2nd place: 2006

Magazine Writing: Serious Feature

1st & 2nd place: 2006, 2007

Magazine Writing: Light Feature

1st & 2nd place: 2006, 2007

Magazine Photography

1st & 2nd place, 2006

Online Publications

1st Place: 2007

The Sun Valley Guide is published spring, summer, fall and winter by Express Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 1013, Ketchum, ID 83340. For advertising and content information, call (208) 726-8060 or e-mail

 

editor@sunvalleyguide.com. Find us at www.sunvalleyguide.com.

©2008 Express Publishing Inc.